New strategies in the management of Parkinson's disease: a biological approach using a phospholipid precursor (CDP-choline).

Agnoli A, Ruggieri S, Denaro A, Bruno G.

Neuropsychobiology 1982;8(6):289-96

Abstract

CDP-choline, an intermediate in the phospholipid metabolic pathway supposed to improve the functionality of the dopamine (DA) system, was administered to parkinsonian patients in a double-blind cross-over study versus placebo.  All patients were already treated with L-dopa + dopa decarboxylase inhibitor. Clinical evaluations were carried out using the Webster Rating Scale (WRS), the Northwestern University Disability Scale (NUDS) and a semiquantitative rating scale for tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. CDP-choline treatment showed a significant improvement of rigidity and bradykinesia and a less important amelioration of tremor. NUDS and WRS showed a similar positive result. Comparing the results obtained by placebo, we found that the actual clinical efficacy of CDP-choline regards mainly bradykinesia and rigidity (23 and 33% improvement, respectively). The positive effect of CDP-choline on Parkinsonian patients already treated with L-dopa + dopa decarboxylase inhibitor stands for a possible action on the DA receptor through an activation of the phospholipid metabolism.

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